Asian Stories

The Weight of Our Sky
by Hanna Alkaf

Amidst the Chinese-Malay conflict in Kuala Lumpur in 1969, sixteen-year-old Melati must overcome prejudice, violence, and her own OCD to find her way back to her mother.

Charming
by Mette Bach

With a modern female version of Prince Charming as the main character, Charming expands the story of the fairy-tale prince to one of a teen girl who learns the true nature of fame and love.

Eighteen-year-old Xifeng is beautiful. The stars say she is destined for greatness, that she is meant to be Empress of Feng Lu. But only if she embraces the darkness within her. Growing up as a peasant in a forgotten village on the edge of the map, Xifeng longs to fulfill the destiny promised to her by her cruel aunt, the witch Guma, who has read the cards and seen glimmers of Xifeng’s majestic future. But is the price of the throne too high? Because in order to achieve greatness, she must spurn the young man who loves her and exploit the callous magic that runs through her veins–sorcery fueled by eating the hearts of the recently killed. For the god who has sent her on this journey will not be satisfied until his power is absolute.

Finding My Voice
by Marie Myung-Ok Lee

As she tries to enjoy her senior year and choose which college she will attend, Korean American Ellen Sung must deal with the prejudice of some of her classmates and pressure from her parents to get good grades.

Heiress Apparently
by Diana Ma

Gemma Huang’s acting career has a big break: she’s asked to play a lead role in an update of M. Butterfly filming for the summer in Beijing. At the airport she is stopped by paparazzi, and realizes she may as well be the twin of Alyssa Chua, one of the most notorious young socialites in Beijing. It becomes a summer of revelations, as Gemma uncovers a legacy her parents have spent their lives protecting her from.

Want
by Cindy Pon

Jason Zhou is trying to survive in Taipei, a city plagued by pollution and viruses. The Jin Corporation profits from the manufacture of special protective suits the wealthy rely on– and may also be manufacturing the pollution that makes them necessary. With the help of his friends, Zhou infiltrates the lives of the wealthy, hoping to destroy the Jin Corporation from within. As he begins falling for Daiyu, the daughter of Jin Corp’s CEO, can he save his city without destroying his own heart?

Genie Lo is one among droves of Ivy-hopeful overachievers in her sleepy Bay Area suburb. You know, the type who wins. When she’s not crushing it at volleyball or hitting the books, Genie is typically working on how to crack the elusive Harvard entry code. But when her hometown comes under siege from hellspawn straight out of Chinese folklore, her priorities are dramatically rearranged. Enter Quentin Sun, a mysterious new kid in class who becomes Genie’s self-appointed guide to battling demons. While Genie knows Quentin only as an attractive transfer student with an oddly formal command of the English language, in another reality he is Sun Wukong, the mythological Monkey King incarnate–right down to the furry tail and penchant for peaches. Suddenly, acing the SATs is the least of Genie’s worries. The fates of her friends, family, and the entire Bay Area all depend on her summoning an inner power that Quentin assures her is strong enough to level the very gates of Heaven. But every second Genie spends tapping into the secret of her true nature is a second in which the lives of her loved ones hang in the balance.

American Born Chinese
by Gene Luen Yang

Story 1: “All Jin Wing wants is to fit in. When his family moves to a new neighborhood, he suddenly finds that he’s the only Chinese American student at the school. Jocki and his bullies pick on him constantly, and he has hardly any friends. Then, to make matters worse, he falls in love with an all-American girl.” Story 2: “Born to rule over all the monkeys in the world, the story of the Monkey King is one of the oldest and greatest Chinese fables. Adored by his subjects, master of the arts of kung-fu, he is the most powerful monkey on Earth. But the Monkey King doesn’t want to be a monkey. He wants to be hailed as a god …” Story 3: “Chin-Kee is the ultimate negative Chinese stereotype, and he’s ruining his cousin Danny’s life. Danny’s a basketball player, a popular kid at school, but every year Chin-Kee comes to visit, and every year Danny has to transfer to a new school to escape the shame. This year, though, things quickly go from bad to worse.”

Dating Makes Perfect
by Pintip Dunn

The Tech sisters don’t date in high school– because they’re not allowed. Until now. Six months after the older Tech twins got to college, their parents asked, ‘Why aren’t you engaged yet?’ Her traditional Thai parents now insist that their youngest daughter, Orrawin (aka ‘Winnie’), must practice fake dating in high school. Under their watchful eyes, of course– and organized based on their favorite rom-coms. The first candidate? The son of their longtime friends. Mat Songsomboon. Who is arrogant, infuriating, and way too good-looking. Her parents love him. If only he weren’t her sworn enemy.

Frankly in Love
by David Yoon

High school senior Frank Li is caught between his parents’ traditional expectations and his own Southern California upbringing. His parents have one rule when it comes to romance: Date Korean. But Frank falls for Brit Means, who is smart, beautiful– and white. Joy Song is in a similar predicament, and they make a pact: they’ll pretend to date each other in order to gain their freedom. It seems like the perfect plan, until their fake-dating maneuver leaves Frank wondering if he ever really understood love- or himself- at all.